Category Archives: Features

Mary Ingles, early American heroine, conclusion

Jadon Gibson

William Ingles was elated with the unexpected return of his wife Mary in November of 1755 though she was emaciated, injured and weak. She had trudged through the wilds for six weeks without food or adequate clothing, motivated by thoughts of returning to her husband and others like herself. She wasn’t much more than a skeleton.

Mary sent for Duchess with whom she escaped from the Shawnees at Big Bone Licks near present-day Cincinnati. During their travels, Continue reading Mary Ingles, early American heroine, conclusion

Family and Consumer Science: An Evolution in the Making

Jeff Rubin

If you’re of a certain age, you may remember home economics as an elective you took in high school when you couldn’t find anything “easier” to take. If you could sew a button, boil water, or knew where to place your knife and fork you could usually get by. But you would have missed the point of what home economics and now consumer and family science is all about. It was, in fact, a revolutionary way to define, elevate, and change the role that many women played in the later 19th and early twentieth centuries as housewives and homemakers. It serves today as an Continue reading Family and Consumer Science: An Evolution in the Making

MARY INGLES, EARLY AMERICAN HEROINE, Part 14

Jadon Gibson

Adam Harman and members of his family hardly recognized their friend and neighbor Mary Ingles after she showed up at the edge of their property in November of 1755.

Mary was kidnapped in July of that year along with her two sons and sister in law. She gave birth to a daughter during the travel to the Indian village in Ohio. Mary’s sons and baby were taken from her. The infant was adopted by an Indian chief but died not long Continue reading MARY INGLES, EARLY AMERICAN HEROINE, Part 14

Mary Ingles, early American heroine, part thirteen

Jadon Gibson

Mary Ingles spent six harrowing weeks in the wilds in October and November of 1755 after escaping from her Shawnee Indian captors near presentday Cincinnati, Ohio. Tired, cold and hungry she fought periods of blindness as she sought her way back to the pioneer settlements of Virginia.

Emaciated, her clothing tattered, her moccasins worn out and her feet with open sores, it took Mary a full day to cross a steep and dangerous mountain. She continued her journey before coming to a rail fence where she paused and yelled as Continue reading Mary Ingles, early American heroine, part thirteen

Mary Ingles, early American heroine, part twelve

Jadon Gibson

Mary Ingles became one of the most admired people in pioneer America because of the events surrounding her capture by Shawnee Indians in 1755 and eventual escape and return to the settlements. She was an early American heroine, an inspiration to other women of the day and to future generations of women.

Mary escaped in October 1755 from a salt camp at Big Bone Licks with an older Dutch woman who had been taken prisoner in Continue reading Mary Ingles, early American heroine, part twelve

Independence as We Age: A Matter of Perspective

Jeff Rubin

There is little doubt people are living longer these days. In fact, data compiled by the Social Security Administration says a man reaching 65 today can expect to live another 19.3 years on average, while a woman turning 65 can expect to live another 19.6. And those are just averages. About one out of every four 65 year-olds will live past 90, and one out of 10 will live past 95. So, where we live and how we live should be important considerations in our lives.

The majority of adults 45 or older say they would like to stay in their own homes for as long as possible. Those that cannot still expect to Continue reading Independence as We Age: A Matter of Perspective

Mary Ingles, early American heroine, part eleven

Jadon Gibson

Mary Ingles and Duchess spent weeks in the wilds while trying to find their way back to the pioneer settlements after escaping from their Shawnee Indian captors in October of 1755. They had little food. Their clothing was tattered and their moccasins used up. Duchess became delirious from the physical and mental strain and Mary fought bouts of blindness.

Mary escaped when Duchess attacked her with a knife and rowed to the opposite shore in an Indian canoe she found. She slept in a cabin Continue reading Mary Ingles, early American heroine, part eleven

MARY INGLES, EARLY AMERICAN HEROINE, Part 10

Jadon Gibson

Mary Ingles and Duchess exhibited signs of extreme physical and mental strain after escaping from the Shawnee Indians in October of 1755. They immediately began a lengthy trek through the wilderness in hopes of finding their way back to the pioneer settlements.

Their moccasins wore out and their clothes grew ragged. This was compounded by wintry days that came earlier than usual. The injuries they sustained and the lack of adequate clothing caused Duchess to second guess her decision to follow Continue reading MARY INGLES, EARLY AMERICAN HEROINE, Part 10

MARY INGLES, EARLY AMERICAN HEROINE, part nine

Jadon Gibson

Mary Ingles was awakened by the sound of a horse early one morning in October of 1755. After several grueling days on the move following their escape Mary and Duchess slept in an abandoned Indian hut across the Ohio River from the main village.

They thought it was an Indian rider they heard and worried about being recaptured. As they slipped into the brush to get away they heard what sounded like the soft ringing of a bell. Soon they learned it was a horse without a rider. Settlers often belled domestic animals in that era and allowed them to roam free. The Indians sought to steal livestock and the bell led the Indians to Continue reading MARY INGLES, EARLY AMERICAN HEROINE, part nine

Mary Ingles, early American heroine, part eight

Jadon Gibson

In early October of 1755 Mary Ingles rode in a canoe caravan that included two dozen warriors, three Frenchmen and an assortment of squaws and children. The ragtag group floated about 160 river miles down the Ohio River to Big Bone Licks, now part of Boone County, KY, near Cincinnati. Mary noticed that the days were becoming shorter and the nights colder.

In July of that year Mary was captured and brought to the Indian village along the Ohio River after a group of Shawnee warriors Continue reading Mary Ingles, early American heroine, part eight

Mary Ingles, early American heroine, part seven

Jadon Gibson

In late summer of 1755, Mary Ingles felt a duty to nurse her sister-in-law, Eliza Draper, back to health before attempting to escape. They had been kidnapped by Indians after the Ingles cabin was torched. The Indians took them to the Lower Towns of the Shawnees along the Ohio River. Within a day or two after their arrival Eliza was forced to run the gauntlet. She suffered many injuries. Continue reading Mary Ingles, early American heroine, part seven

Mary Ingles, early American heroine, part 6

Jadon Gibson

The Lower Towns of the Shawnees stretched along both sides of the Ohio River and was the strangest thing that Mary Ingles had ever seen. The blood-curdling screams of the residents when she arrived with her captors and other prisoners gave her goosebumps and put her in fear for her life and that of her children.

Mary was held in good favor however because of her deeds on the trip following her capture. The chief told her that she and her Continue reading Mary Ingles, early American heroine, part 6

Taking Care of a Loved One Impacts More Than You Think

Jeff Rubin

You don’t have to look far these days to find someone taking care of the wellbeing of a parent, spouse, or friend. You may, in fact, be one of them. If you are, you’ve joined the ranks of approximately 735,000 Kentucky “family caregivers” and some 65 million adults nationwide who have taken on that role. By definition, a family caregiver can be anyone (a relative, friend, or neighbor) who provides assistance related to a primary physical or mental disability and are unpaid for those services. Continue reading Taking Care of a Loved One Impacts More Than You Think

Mary Ingles, early American heroine, part 5

Jadon Gibson

Mary Ingles gave birth to a healthy baby daughter on the third night of their journey to the Shawnee Indian town in Ohio following her capture by the Indians on July 5, 1755.

She knew her captors would arise early the following morning and she would have to climb upon the horse and keep up with the procession, not slowing their travel. Her life and that of her children depended on it. Continue reading Mary Ingles, early American heroine, part 5

Mary Ingles, early American heroine, part 4

Jadon Gibson

Silent prayers helped the pregnant Mary Ingles overcome the perilous days before she won the respect of the Indian chief after her kidnapping on July 8, 1775. He allowed her to ride a horse rather than walk after she demonstrated her value in the Indian camp. Her four-year old, Thomas, sat closely behind her while her two-year old, George, was in front.

The Indians killed her mother and Col. James Patton before burning the Ingles cabin. The Indians also kidnapped Eliza Draper, Mary’s Continue reading Mary Ingles, early American heroine, part 4