Category Archives: Church & Religious

Church & Religious

Gov. Bevin Submits Amicus Brief in Support of Local Business Ordered to Print T-Shirts in Violation of Religious Beliefs

Matt Bevin

Gov. Matt Bevin has submitted an amicus brief to the Kentucky Supreme Court in the landmark case of Lexington-Fayette Urban County Human Rights Commission v. Hands-On Originals.

Gov. Bevin’s amicus brief supports Hands-On Originals, a small t-shirt printing business in Lexington.  In 2014, the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Human Rights Commission determined that Hands-On violated Lexington’s fairness ordinance after the owners declined to print t-shirts promoting homosexuality Continue reading Gov. Bevin Submits Amicus Brief in Support of Local Business Ordered to Print T-Shirts in Violation of Religious Beliefs

A Boy named Sue, conclusion

Jadon Gibson

Sue Mundy, born Marcellus Jerome Clark, was barely sixteen years old when he joined the Confederate army at Camp Cheatham in Robertson County, TN. Though very boyish in appearance, he served with distinction at Fort Donelson, on the Cumberland River in early 1862. The fort was built to control the Cumberland River, a major waterway in Tennessee.

Yankee Brig. Gen. U. S. Grant’s Yankee forces captured Fort Henry on February 6, 1862, and marched his men across country with Continue reading A Boy named Sue, conclusion

Gov. Bevin Hosts 52nd Annual Kentucky Governor’s Prayer Breakfast

Gov. Bevin

Gov. Matt Bevin was joined in Lexington today by approximately 1,200 community leaders, elected officials, private citizens, and members of the faith-based community for the 52nd annual Kentucky Governor’s Prayer Breakfast.

“People turn to prayer, not because it’s insignificant or a cultural crutch, but because it truly changes things,” said Gov. Bevin. “People earnestly, instinctively, and collectively turn to prayer because when, at a time when everything else fades by comparison, the only tangible thing is prayer.” Continue reading Gov. Bevin Hosts 52nd Annual Kentucky Governor’s Prayer Breakfast

A Boy named Sue

Jadon Gibson

Kentucky was a neutral state during the Civil War and her people were evenly divided in their sentiment toward the north and south. It resulted in Kentuckians fighting against their own brothers and neighbors in many battles during the war.

In the Battle of Murfreesboro there were seventeen Kentucky regiments on the side of the Confederates and fourteen regiments fighting for the Federals. In the second Battle of Murfreesboro there were 23,500 combatants. A total of 3,024 were killed, 15,747 wounded and 4,744 unaccounted for. Never had so many Kentuckians killed each other for any cause. Continue reading A Boy named Sue

The unlucky good-luck piece, conclusion

Jadon Gibson

Armistead M. Swope and William C. Goodloe were born and raised in Lincoln County, Kentucky. Both became attorneys and enemies.

Col. Goodloe offended Col. Swope at the Republican State convention in Louisville, May 1, 1888. Swope was bitter and sought Goodloe without success but found him the following month at the Phoenix Hotel in Lexington. A violent argument ensued resulting in threats of violence. Good friends intervened on their behalf and each selected two representatives to confer with the aim of alleviating their hostility. Continue reading The unlucky good-luck piece, conclusion

Church Leaders to Gather at the Capitol for Weekly Prayer in Action

KCC

January 11, 2018.  The Kentucky Council of Churches is hosting Prayer in Action Days at the State Capitol each Tuesday during the General Assembly to pray for government officials and act on behalf of Kentucky’s most vulnerable citizens. A kick-off event was held Tuesday, January 9th in the Capitol Rotunda. Subsequent gatherings, listed below, will begin at 9:30 a.m. in the Capitol Annex.

Continue reading Church Leaders to Gather at the Capitol for Weekly Prayer in Action

Coal miners – 2017 subject of John Rice Irwin’s Christmas message

Jadon Gibson

John Rice Irwin, founder of the fabulous Museum of Appalachia just off Highway 75 near Knoxville, Tenn, chose coal miners as the subject of his Christmas message this year that I just received from my good friend.

“This year I honor the coal miners,” he began. “No group has sacrificed and gave so much and received so little for their laborious contributions. To paraphrase a line from President Lincoln, they were ‘little noted nor long remembered.’ I am presenting glimpses of a few of these remarkable souls in the hope it will prompt us to appreciate their contributions to America. Continue reading Coal miners – 2017 subject of John Rice Irwin’s Christmas message