Remember that morning, remember everyone, remember September 11, 2001

This month is the nine year anniversary of the attack on America. We all remember where we were that tragic morning and will never forget the horrific images of that day. So please take a moment to remember the victims and their families.
There were a total of 2,996 deaths, including the 19 hijackers and 2,977 victims. The victims were distributed as follows: 246 on the four planes (Flights 11, 93, 77, & 175 from which there were no survivors), 2,606 in New York City in the towers and on the ground, and 125 at the Pentagon. All the deaths in the attacks were civilians except for 55 military personnel killed at the Pentagon.
A total of 411 emergency workers who responded to the scene died as they attempted to rescue people and fight fires. The New York City Fire Department (FDNY) lost 341 firefighters and 2 FDNY paramedics. The New York City Police Department lost 23 officers. The Port Authority Police Department lost 37 officers, and 8 additional EMTs and paramedics from private EMS units were killed. More than 90 countries lost citizens in the attacks on the World Trade Center.
Ground Zero Today
One World Trade Center, also known by its former name Freedom Tower, is the main building of the new World Trade Center complex in Lower Manhattan in New York City, New York. The tower will be located in the northwest corner of the 16-acre World Trade Center site bounded by Vesey, West, Washington and Fulton streets. Construction on below-ground utility relocations, footings, and foundations for the building began on April 27, 2006. On March 30, 2009, the Port Authority said that the building will be known as ””One World Trade Center””, replacing its former name ””Freedom Tower””. Upon completion, One World Trade Center will be the tallest building in the United States standing at a height of 1,776 feet.
Along with One World Trade Center, the new World Trade Center site will feature three other high-rise office buildings along Greenwich Street and the National September 11 Memorial & Museum. The construction is part of an effort to memorialize and rebuild after the original World Trade Center complex was destroyed during the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001.
The Memorial
The Memorial will remember and honor the nearly three thousand people who died in the horrific attacks of February 26, 1993, and September 11, 2001. The Memorial will consist of two massive pools set within the footprints of the Twin Towers with the largest manmade waterfalls in the country cascading down their sides. They will be a powerful reminder of the Twin Towers and of the unprecedented loss of life from an attack on our soil.

The names of the nearly 3,000 individuals who were killed in the September 11 attacks in New York City, Pennsylvania, and at the Pentagon, and the February 1993 World Trade Center bombing will be inscribed around the edges of the Memorial pools.

The Memorial pools will each be nearly one-acre in size. The names of the victims will be inscribed on parapets surrounding the pools, within groupings that will allow for family members, friends, and co-workers who shared life’s journey and perished together to have their names listed side by side.

An eight-acre landscaped Memorial Plaza filled with nearly 400 trees will create a contemplative space separate from the sights and sounds of the surrounding city.

The Memorial design, created by architect Michael Arad and landscape architect Peter Walker, was selected from a design competition that included more than 5,200 entrants from 63 nations
The almost 3,000 names of the men, women, and children killed in the attacks of September 11, 2001 and February 26, 1993 will be inscribed on bronze parapets surrounding the twin Memorial pools.

The display of these names is the very heart of the Memorial. The design of the names parapet provides a direct relationship between the visitor, the names, and the water, allowing for a feeling of quiet reverence between the visitor and the Memorial.

Names will be stencil-cut into the parapets, allowing visitors to look through the names at the water, and to create paper impressions or rubbings of individual names. At night, light will shine up through the voids created by each letter.

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